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How to photograph the Andromeda Galaxy
The Orion Nebula
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Tom Oswald

Tom Oswald
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How to photograph the Andromeda Galaxy

Andromeda Galaxy taken using a Nikon D7100 and a telephoto 70-300mm lens. This was taken at 300mm F5.4 and was piggy backed to a Celestron telescope and a Takahasi Temma ii mount. Total exposure was about4 hours

Andromeda is located Near the Cassiopeia constellation, you can find it by star hopping from the W-shaped constellation, Cassiopeia . As seen from the Northern Hemisphere on these November evenings, Cassiopeia appears in the northeast sky at nightfall and swings high to the north as evening progresses. It’s easy to spot, shaped like an M or W. One half of the W is more deeply notched than the other half. This deeper V points to the Andromeda galaxy.

Once you have located the Galaxy and aligned your mount to the north star, it's time to setup your camera. This picture was taken over a period of 4 hours with 5 minute exposure times to reduce the effect of light pollution (a big problem where i am) once the full exposure was taken 30 flats and 30 lights where taken, the end result being the photo you see above

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  • Image type: image/jpeg
  • Uploaded: 27th February 2016
  • Category: Science
  • Views: 345
  • Likes: 60



  • Laura Captain
    • Seller
    • Pro
    11 months ago
    Wow, wow!
  • Jola Martysz
    2 years ago
    Cool shot. I envy your equipment ;-)
  • Crush'd Curiosity
    2 years ago
    Cool take on one of out best local galaxy neighbours! Never seen it with green colouration before
    • Tom Oswald
      2 years ago
      I think it was light pollution
      • Crush'd Curiosity
        2 years ago
        Ohh, I thought you'd added it in post-shot. Has human pollution started getting to other galaxies now ;)
        • Tom Oswald
          2 years ago
          No, but the telescope wasn't outside of the atmosphere ;)
  • Jim Anglin
    2 years ago
    Humbling isn't it? I mean when you stop to think that we're hurtling round the sun at around 32,000 km/ hour (or is that per minute?)
    • Tom Oswald
      2 years ago
      yup, 67,000 miles per hour round the sun, and our solar system within the milky way is moving at 1.3 million miles per hour
  • Ed Bayeng
    2 years ago
    Amazing!
  • JIturbe
    2 years ago
    Amazing!! I never would have imagined you would have taken that with a 70-300mm!!
  • Marius Radu
    2 years ago
    Nice shot :-)
  • EagleC
    2 years ago
    Great photo, I'd like to try something like this myself so do you mind if I ask a couple of questions? What are flats and lights? and what ISO did you use for a 5 minute exposure at f5.4?

    • Tom Oswald
      2 years ago
      There are some detailed write ups on our blog here http://blog.clickasnap.com/category/astrophotogrphy/
    • Tom Oswald
      2 years ago
      Hi, flats are photos taken with the lens cap on, and lights are taken with the lens pointed at a uniform light source. This then ensures that any defects/dirt in the lens/camera can be taken out of the image. This isn't a single 5 minute epxosure, it is 4 hours of 5 minute exposures. So 48 x 5 minute exposures stacked on top of each other. I believe the ISO was 400 or thereabouts
      • Tom Oswald
        2 years ago
        There is some detailed write ups on our blog here http://blog.clickasnap.com/category/astrophotogrphy/
        • EagleC
          2 years ago
          Thanks, I realised it was a stacked image! Going to have to give it another go, thanks for the advice and inspiration :)
          • Tom Oswald
            2 years ago
            Do you have a tracking mount and star tracker?
            • EagleC
              2 years ago
              I do have a tracking mount... but its the EQ2m and I fear its not going to be good enough after reading your experiences. I've had it a year and only once lined it up well enough at which point it clouded over for the rest of the night. It's really hard to find the time, when its clear, to spend the hours setting the whole thing up. That's probably my single biggest problem.

              I also seem to have some shake or vibration effecting my 3-4 second exposures of the night sky on a normal tripod (timed or remote shutter release). All the stars are short lines when I zoom in to the photo rather than points.
              • Tom Oswald
                2 years ago
                Yea unfortunately the money has to be spent on a mount, that literally makes or breaks a photo. The Takahashi mount was so good you could do unguided exposures of 10-20 minutes easily. Are you using a 'mirror up' camera state prior to actually taking the picture? Mirror slap could be causing that vibration issue
                • EagleC
                  2 years ago
                  I've tried mirror up and down but I haven't identified which of the resulting photos where which. I wish I could afford a mount like that! They need to rent them!!
                  • Tom Oswald
                    2 years ago
                    Business opportunity right there ;)
  • Alan Hinchliffe
    2 years ago
    Superb, got to be someone else out there.
    • Tom Oswald
      2 years ago
      I'd be very surprised if there wasn't that's for sure
  • Steven Van Aerschot
    2 years ago
    holy smoke!!! :-O
    • Tom Oswald
      2 years ago
      Was a fun photo to take :)
  • Merry Hoppes
    3 years ago
    Wow! That is really awesome!